Newsroom

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A little appreciation makes the world go round

 

My week has got off to a great start, with two little notes from clients: 

“I want to say thank you for saving us. We took on your suggestions and will publish the first article later this week.” 

And…

“This is fantastic! It makes such a difference when using a more engaging tone in such a communication.” 

One of the many rewarding things about working with clients is the lovely feedback I receive. It never ceases to amaze me when I hear about negative bosses who completely ignore the 99 things done well and focus on the 1 tiny thing that could be improved.

Most of us who take a pride in our work are so easy to motivate. A sincere ‘thank you’ or ‘job well done’ is a great motivator. I know I’m on cloud 9 and energised for the rest of the day – or even the week!

 So, who could you thank today?

 

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3 dos and 3 don’ts when giving feedback to your copywriter/business writer

A conversation today with a colleague who has been struggling to interpret her client’s enigmatic feedback prompts me to write this post…

The copy is on your desk, ready for you to review. What’s the best way to feed back to your writer? Here are some tips:

  1. Do acknowledge receipt and be prompt with your feedback. If you let the copy disappear into a black hole, it will be harder for the copywriter to pick it up again. Keep them posted if there’s a delay.
  2. Do be specific. If you say, “It needs more about x”, without giving any details about ‘x’, the copywriter won’t know where to start.
  3. Do make changes visible – preferably by using Word tracking – so the copywriter doesn’t have to hunt for your changes in order to check they flow into the copy. Incidentally, marking up changes in the text is better than having lots of ‘comments’ boxes in the margin.

 

  1. Don’t expect your copywriter to discuss every little change with you. It will be the most efficient use of the copywriter’s time – and your budget – if you mark up the changes in the text and leave any discussion for significant issues or new content.
  2. Don’t make vague observations. Your copywriter isn’t a mind reader! “It needs more passion” isn’t a clear steer.
  3. Don’t send back multiple versions from different people. If several contributors need to review, circulate the document and get them to mark up their feedback on a single version. Otherwise, the poor copywriter has to try to reconcile possibly conflicting feedback.

 

I’m pleased to report that my own clients give me very focused, timely feedback. It helps me to help them!

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How to stand out from the crowd on LinkedIn

As having a LinkedIn makeover seems very popular with my clients at the moment, I am posting an updated version of an article I wrote a few months ago. While the tips are mainly aimed at helping job-hunters, the principles apply to anyone wanting to make a good impression on LinkedIn… Continue reading “How to stand out from the crowd on LinkedIn”

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5 winning ways to write an award entry

I’ve just heard that my client IRIS Software Group has been shortlisted in this year’s Cloud World Series awards for its solutions for accountants working ‘in the cloud’, which I helped to write. Good luck IRIS!

As several clients in different industries have recently asked for my help in preparing an entry for their specific industry award recently, I’d like to share my 5 tops tips… Continue reading “5 winning ways to write an award entry”

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How much intellectual property should you give away?

Rose-pink-macaroons-007Picnic is a wonderful Reading cafe that provides excellent lunch-time fodder with fast service, making it a hit with local office workers, many of whom go back to their desks well supplied with Picnic’s delicious macaroons to help them through the afternoon.

Now Picnic has released its secret recipe! It made me wonder how much IP Continue reading “How much intellectual property should you give away?”